Peer-to-Peer sharing: what's an impression worth?

Osas Obaiza (@whattheduck32) shares an intersting stat in his iMedia post:

"Twitter received roughly 0.38 clicks per tweet, whereas Facebook received 3.31 clicks per engagement (the number of times people posted a Mashable link to Facebook through an action on a social plugin or through a wall post)."

I’ll bet it’s true that lots of posts don’t get read thoroughly as they’re tweeted around, but really, what’s the point? What is an impression anyway? I’m flipping through a magazine and I see an ad for an apparel brand. What was that but fleeting? In most cases, it’s an accumulation of small impressions that lead to an eventual conversion and I’ll tell you for a certainty that the impressions made on my by my friends hit harder than paid advertising. And nothing is a standalone platform, my friend. Skilled marketers make it all work in concert—print, radio, TV, social, you name it.

Communications training program challenges doctors

Actually, it challenges everybody. I love this quote: “In that room there is really no hierarchy,” Sandy Clancy says. “There is no hierarchy of status; there is no hierarchy of knowledge. Everybody sitting at that table has really valuable wisdom to contribute.”

More great work from the Quality & Safety team and Family Advisory Council at MassGeneral Hospital for Children!

Proprietary Social Media for Healthcare

I think I’m going to do a series of blog posts about myopia (my own). Most recently I’ve been a short-sighted idiot about the possible uses of proprietary social media platforms for hospitals—these would be branded communities tied to a specific hospital system or academic medical center. 

We heard the first whispers last year and at the time I thought, “People are not going to adopt a new platform that requires time away from Facebook, Twitter, etc., and if they do they’re likely to want to do it on PatientsLikeMe or WebMD, not a hospital site.” I was also concerned that since hosptals are typically limited by geography, the potential audience would be small relative to the blockbuster social-media sites. (My first friend on Mayo is actually from Malaysia.)

What’s the most important thing you need to consider in content-management strategy today? In two words, “platform fragmentation.” If you don’t plan for content delivery to mobile and other devices, you’re going to flush a lot of money. And you really can’t build your site and then figure out how to deliver to additional platforms via agile development—you’d be doomed to an eternal game of catch-up. Back in the Nineties, Web developers used to keep “browser farms” to ensure their sites would display correctly in different versions of IE, Firefox, and Safari. The simplicity of that challenge is laughable compared to what we face today. In addition to operating systems and browsers, the number of devices is proliferating at an astounding rate. So if you’re making Flash brand canvasses that look terrific on a desktop at 1280 x 1024, allowing 800-pixel graphics, or not keeping your code uniform, I hope your mom enjoys the site. Because people on the go (using iphones, ipads, android and blackberry devices, etc.) are just going to see a road block. More on this soon, including what to do about it.
Click here to add me to your G+ circles.

What’s the most important thing you need to consider in content-management strategy today? In two words, “platform fragmentation.” If you don’t plan for content delivery to mobile and other devices, you’re going to flush a lot of money. And you really can’t build your site and then figure out how to deliver to additional platforms via agile development—you’d be doomed to an eternal game of catch-up. Back in the Nineties, Web developers used to keep “browser farms” to ensure their sites would display correctly in different versions of IE, Firefox, and Safari. The simplicity of that challenge is laughable compared to what we face today. In addition to operating systems and browsers, the number of devices is proliferating at an astounding rate. So if you’re making Flash brand canvasses that look terrific on a desktop at 1280 x 1024, allowing 800-pixel graphics, or not keeping your code uniform, I hope your mom enjoys the site. Because people on the go (using iphones, ipads, android and blackberry devices, etc.) are just going to see a road block. More on this soon, including what to do about it.

Click here to add me to your G+ circles.

ADHD and substance abuse in children and adolescents, Q&A with Timothy Wilens, MD

Results of two long-term studies out of Mass General show ADHD significantly increases risk of substance abuse for boys and girls, but lead researcher Timothy Wilens, MD, a pediatric psychiatrist, gives practical tips for parents about how to talk to kids. Learn more.

Click here to add me to your G+ circles.

E. Coli Outbreak in Europe and Tips for Food Safety at Home

Infectious disease specialist Jason Harris, MD, of MassGeneral Hospital for Children, answers questions about the recent E. coli outbreak and explains what you can do to protect your family from food-borne illness. Learn more.

Click here to add me to your G+ circles.

Facebook is a broadcast channel

I recently put together a list of tactics to increase likes on hospital Facebook pages. In the course of querying a lot of smart people about best practices and tactics, I got a fair amount of push-back, mostly along the lines of “Why would you need to do that? Social media is about engagement—it’s not an arms race for likes and it’s not a broadcast channel.”

That’s been the conventional wisdom ever since Josh Bernoff and Charlene Li published Groundswell.

It’s time to challenge it.

Here’s the primary reason: you cannot have meaningful engagement without critical mass. You just can’t. Ask any cub scout leader, minister, or community organizer. If people don’t show up, it’s going to be difficult to have a den meeting. And if they don’t know there’s a meeting, they’re not going to come.

Let’s look at the numbers.

Still Not Going To Do This Every Day: Move over Twitter... Make room for Tumblr

ricksancheztv:

Social media has changed the way we receive news. It’s also changed how it’s reported.

When the “Arab Spring” hit Egypt, I began tweeting. A lot. We were witnessing history and I was riveted to my television and my computer. I tweeted out information and updates for no…

How to Build a Facebook-Killer

mitchwagner:

My latest on The CMO Site:

Facebook is vulnerable to a potential competitor that recognizes what Facebook doesn’t: the fact that many of us play different roles in life, and that we don’t like mixing those roles.

Facebook believes you should have only one identity for everyone in your life, and if you live differently, you lack integrity. In real life, most of us have separate identities for our different roles. Facebook needs to implement easy-to-use tools to allow people to manage their multiple roles and identities. Either that, or Facebook will ultimately succumb to a competitor that does.

7 tips to avoid HIPAA violations in social media

Originally posted on KevinMD 6 June 2011.

There have been a couple of widely-publicized cases recently of physicians divulging patient information in social media. I’m sure the doctors involved did not intend to violate patient privacy.

While there are several excellent guidelines and policies on this topic, there isn’t a whole lot of practical advice, so here are my tips to help you avoid privacy violations (I hope this is the beginning of a conversation that will encourage more doctors to participate in social media).

1. Don’t talk about patients, even in general terms. It’s so difficult to anonymize patients, it’s not worth your time to attempt it.

For example, it’s pretty obvious no thinking person would post this: “Dave Ekrem was in the ER last night with alcohol-induced liver disease.”

But this could also identify your patient: “We had a fifty-year-old male in the ER last night with alcohol-induced liver disease.” (Somebody’s going to say “Really? In Boston? Hey—where was Dave last night? He’s fifty. Oh—I feel sorry for the kids.”)

And so could this: “Had a patient in the ER last night with alcohol-induced liver disease.” It takes only a couple of clues for the sleuths and wags to piece something together. As little as time frame OR geography, coupled with condition, could be enough.